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Addressing the Problem of Untested SAKs - Archival
Archival - Dr. Rebecca Campbell presented information to better understand the issues pertaining to the accumulation of unsubmitted sexual assault kits (SAKs) including assessing the scope of untested SAKs and understanding the underlying causes.
Addressing the Problem of Untested Sexual Assault Kits (SAKs) - Archival Version

Dr. Rebecca Campbell, professor of psychology at Michigan State University and member of the Sexual Assault Kit Initiative, Training and Technical Assistance team, presented this webinar. Participants were provided with information to better understand issues pertaining to unsubmitted SAKs including assessing the scope of untested SAKs, understanding the underlying causes which result in the accumulation of unsubmitted SAKs and developing testing and victim notification plans which promote an improved response to sexual assault. Dr. Campbell leverages her experience as the lead researcher for the National Institute of Justice-funded Detroit Sexual Assault Kit Action Research Project, which was a four-year multidisciplinary study of Detroit's untested rape kits in combination with her extensive research conducting community-based research on violence against women and children, with an emphasis on sexual assault.

Speaker

Dr. Rebecca Campbell
Dr. Rebecca Campbell is a Professor of Psychology at Michigan State University and a national leader in training on the neurobiology of trauma. For the past 25 years, she has been conducting community-based research on violence against women and children, with an emphasis on sexual assault. Dr. Campbell’s research examines how contact with the legal and medical systems affects adult, adolescent, and pediatric victims’ psychological and physical health.
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This project was supported by Grant No. 2015-AK-BX-K021 awarded by the Bureau of Justice Assistance. The Bureau of Justice Assistance is a component of the Department of Justice's Office of Justice Programs, which also includes the Bureau of Justice Statistics, the National Institute of Justice, the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, the Office for Victims of Crime, and the SMART Office. Points of view or opinions in this document are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.